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The coolest use of light - how to make and study the coldest matter in the universe

Life and Matter Sciences Conference May 10, 2017 Madrid

General information

Venue: Fundación Ramón Areces, Vitruvio, 5. 28006. Madrid
Limited capacity

  • Free assistance

Organized by:

Fundación Ramón Areces

In cooperation with:

Real Sociedad Española de Fisica

  • Programme

Light has many important properties and applications. I will explain that light exerts forces on particles and objects. These forces deflect the tails of comets, they are used in the form of optical tweezers to manipulate cells and DNA in biological samples, and they allow the trapping of atoms. Laser light can cool matter to temperatures close to absolute zero and was used to study the phenomenon of superfluidity.

Wednesday, 10

19:30

Speaker:
Wolfgang Ketterle
Prize of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2001. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.

Wolfgang Ketterle: received a diploma (equivalent to a master's degree) from the Technical University of Munich (1982), and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Munich (1986). After postdoctoral work at the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany, the University of Heidelberg and at MIT, he joined the physics faculty at MIT (1993), where he is now the John D. MacArthur Professor of Physics. He does experimental research in atomic physics and laser spectroscopy and focuses currently on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases. He was among the first scientists to observe this phenomenon in 1995, and realized the first atom laser in 1997. His earlier research was in molecular spectroscopy and combustion diagnostics.

His awards include a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship (1996), the Rabi Prize of the American Physical Society (1997), the Gustav-Hertz Prize of the German Physical Society (1997), the Discover Magazine Award for Technological Innovation (1998), the Fritz London Prize in Low Temperature Physics (1999), the Dannie-Heineman Prize of the Academy of Sciences, Göttingen, Germany (1999), the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics (2000), and the Nobel Prize in Physics (2001, together with E.A. Cornell and C.E. Wieman).

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